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Privacy Policy

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What Information is collected?

The WiFi Booth (henceforth referred to as the application), owned and operated by Timothy Carr (henceforth referred to as the developer), does not directly collect any information. However, the application makes use of several third-party data providers, which collect information:

These third-parties may collect the following non-personally identifiable information, and share it with the developer:

  • Apple/iOS Advertising Identifier, also known as the Apple “IDFA”
  • Anonymous device-type information, such as “iPad 2 Mini”
  • Anonymous runtime information, such as “320MB memory free”
  • Anonymous information specific to application crashes, such as which line of the code was being executed when the crash occurred

If you use purchase a subscription in The WiFi Booth and you opt to save this subscription to your Facebook account, then the following additional information is collected:

  • The Facebook ID, such as “123456789012345”
  • The name registered with the Facebook account, such as “John Appleseed”

Specifically, the email address associated with the Facebook account is not collected.

Is connecting my Facebook account mandatory?

No. You can purchase subscriptions and opt not to save the subscription to your Facebook account.

What is done with this information?

The developer may use this information to improve the application, by becoming aware of crashes and issues in the application and using the information to fix them. In the extremely rare event of a crash that cannot be fixed with anonymous information, the developer may attempt to contact you through Facebook, by sending you a Facebook message asking you for further details.

How did you get my consent?

When you download the application from the Apple App Store, and open the application, you indicate your consent.

How do I withdraw my consent?

You may withdraw your consent at any time by deleting the application, and contacting the developer on The WiFi Booth community forums, here: http://thewifibooth.com/community/viewforum.php?f=2

Do you share or disclose my information?

No, with one exception: we may disclose collected information if we are required by law to do so.

Where is this information stored and secured?

User-information collected (including Facebook info) is stored on Google FireBase, using state-of-the-art encryption. The account used by the developer to access Google FireBase is secured using a strong password as well as two-factor authentication. For more information please visit http://firebase.google.com. Anonymous device information (including crash reports) is stored on Fabric, using state-of-the-art encryption. For more information please visit http://fabric.io

Please Read

In general, the third-party providers used by us will only collect, use and disclose your information to the extent necessary to allow them to perform the services they provide to us.

However, certain third-party service providers have their own privacy policies in respect to the information we are required to provide to them.

For these providers, we recommend that you read their privacy policies so you can understand the manner in which your personal information will be handled by these providers.

Changes to this Privacy Policy

The developer reserves the right to modify this privacy policy at any time, so please review it frequently. Changes and clarifications will take effect immediately.

How to Connect your Nikon using Built-In WiFi

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This article will help you get wifibooth on your iPhone connected to your Nikon DSLR using its built-in wifi. The steps here are should be the same as if you were connecting with the official Nikon iOS app.

  1. On your camera menu, navigate to the menu with wifi and turn on the wifi connection
  2. Connect the iPhone wifi to the Nikon camera, by going to the Settings App on your iPhone.
  3. On your iPhone, start wifibooth and choose to connect to your camera on the first screen.
  4. After some moments wifibooth will automatically connect to your camera. If your camera has additional steps to go through to when you connect the official iOS Nikon app, then perform these same steps now on your camera.
  5. Configure your camera to save JPG (either only JPG, or JPG+RAW; the app will not download RAW files), and make sure the resolution is not too high. If photos arriving on the iPhone are huge, you’ll get a warning.

How to Connect your Canon using Built-In WiFi

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This article will help you connect your iPhone with WiFi Booth to your Canon camera.

If you plan to connect your camera and your iPhone to a wifi router, ie. you are at home on your home wifi, then this is called Infrastructure mode. Or, if you plan to connect your iPhone directly to the wifi of the camera, then this is called Camera Access Point mode.

Connecting with Infrastructure Mode

  1. Connect the iPhone’s wifi to your wifi router (if you’re at home, it is probably already connected)
  2. Start WiFi Booth on your iPhone, select to connect to your camera on the first screen, and then leave it running
  3. On your Canon camera, open up the wifi menu. Here’s where to find it:canon-wifi-menus
  4. On the camera wifi menu, choose Smartphone mode. That’s the top-middle one: canon-wifi-menus-2
  5. On the camera, choose infrastructure mode, select your wifi router, and enter the password. You can choose auto IP settings.
  6. After a few moments (in rare cases, it can take up to a minute or two!), the app automatically finds the camera and asks to connect to it. On the camera, you’ll see that WiFi Booth is requesting to connect. Hit OK to allow connection. Your camera will save these settings so that next time all you have to do is turn on the camera, and start wifi and the rest is automatic. Only after you’ve accepted the initial connection on the camera (once) does the app show that the camera is connected.
  7. Configure your camera to save JPG (either only JPG, or JPG+RAW; the app will not download RAW files), and make sure the resolution is not too high. If photos arriving on the iPhone are huge, you’ll get a warning.

Connecting with Camera Access Point Mode

  1. On your Canon camera, open up the wifi menu. Here’s where to find it:canon-wifi-menus
  2. On the camera wifi menu, choose Smartphone mode. That’s the top-middle one: canon-wifi-menus-2
  3. On the camera, choose Camera Access Point mode, then choose Easy connection.
  4. Now connect your iPhone’s wifi to the camera using the information your camera is displaying on the screen. You can change your iPhone’s wifi network in the Settings App.
  5. Once your iPhone is connected to your camera’s wifi, launch WiFi Booth on your iPhone and select connect to camera on the first screen.
  6. After a few moments (in rare cases, it can take up to a minute or two!), the app automatically finds the camera and asks to connect to it. On the camera, you’ll see that WiFi Booth is requesting to connect. Hit OK to allow connection. Your camera will save these settings so that next time all you have to do is turn on the camera, and start wifi and the rest is automatic. Only after you’ve accepted the initial connection on the camera (once) does the app show that the camera is connected.
  7. Configure your camera to save JPG (either only JPG, or JPG+RAW; the app will not download RAW files), and make sure the resolution is not too high. If photos arriving on the iPhone are huge, you’ll get a warning.

Are you stuck? Please ask for help in the WiFi Booth Community!

How to Connect your Sony using Built-in Wi-Fi

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This article will help you use your Sony camera’s built-in “Smart Remote” app to connect with WiFi Booth on your iPhone.

Update Smart Remote app

To connect to your Sony camera, your Sony camera must be running the built-in Sony app called “Smart Remote”. This app does not get updated when you update your camera’s firmware, and brand-new Sony cameras ship with out-of-date apps (so yes, you DO need to update Smart Remote). Updating the Smart Remote app is out of the scope of this article but here are some hints: some Sony cameras, like the a6300, can update the Sony Smart Remote app directly on the camera itself. Others like the A7 II require a computer to be connected. To use WiFi Booth with your Sony camera, please first make sure you update Smart Remote. Consult your manual for further details, or use one of these links to learn more: Brian Smith’s Installing and Updating Sony Apps, and Colby Brown’s Installing and Updating Apps on your Sony Camera.

Steps

  1. On your camera, start the Smart Remote app. You already updated it, right? Smart-Remote-Enbedded
  2. Connect your iPhone’s wifi to your camera, using the instructions on the screen. On most Sony cameras the wifi password is not shown by default. You can show it by pressing the Trash button (while on the wifi start screen of the Smart Remote app)
  3. Start WiFi Booth on the iPhone
  4. After a few moments, you’ll see WiFi Booth connect to your Sony camera
  5. On the camera, hit the Menu button, and double-check that the camera is configured to only shoot JPG photos (no RAW). Also make sure you are not sending gigantic 30MP files over, as that would make your iPhone work very hard to downsize the photos.
  6. Start taking photos on your Sony camera, and the photos automatically appear in the app! You can also trigger the camera with the red shutter button

 


If you want to print while the wifi of your iPhone is connected to your Sony camera, then you need a second iOS device to share the printer using the free app BluePrint. You can read how to configure WiFi Booth to work with BluePrint here.

 

Are you stuck? Please ask for help in the WiFi Booth Community!

How to Connect your Sony using Built-in Wi-Fi

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This article will help you use your Sony camera’s built-in “Smart Remote” app to connect with WiFi Booth.

Update Smart Remote app

To connect to your Sony camera, your Sony camera must be running the built-in Sony app called “Smart Remote”. This app does not get updated when you update your camera’s firmware, and brand-new Sony cameras ship with out-of-date apps (so yes, you DO need to update Smart Remote). Updating the Smart Remote app is out of the scope of this article but here are some hints: some Sony cameras, like the a6300, can update the Sony Smart Remote app directly on the camera itself. Others like the A7 II require a computer to be connected. To use WiFi Booth with your Sony camera, please first make sure you update Smart Remote. Consult your manual for further details, or use one of these links to learn more: Brian Smith’s Installing and Updating Sony Apps, and Colby Brown’s Installing and Updating Apps on your Sony Camera.

Steps

  1. On your camera, start the Smart Remote app. You already updated it, right? Smart-Remote-Enbedded
  2. Connect your iPad’s wifi to your camera, using the instructions on the screen. On most Sony cameras the wifi password is not shown by default. You can show it by pressing the Trash button (while on the wifi start screen of the Smart Remote app)
  3. Start WiFi Booth on the iPad, and choose Built-In Wifi
  4. After a few moments, you’ll see WiFi Booth connect to your Sony camera
  5. On the camera, hit the Menu button, and double-check that the camera is configured to only shoot JPG photos (no RAW). Also make sure you are not sending gigantic 30MP files over, as that would make your iPad work very hard to downsize the photos. Choose a resolution as close to 1800 x 1200 pixels as possible (assuming you are printing 4×6 and you left this as the default print resolution chosen in the Settings app -> WiFi Booth)
  6. Start taking photos on your Sony camera, and the photos automatically appear in the app! You can also trigger the camera with the red shutter button

 


If you want to print while the wifi of your iPad is connected to your Sony camera, then you need a second iOS device to share the printer using the free app BluePrint. You can read how to configure WiFi Booth to work with BluePrint here.

 

Are you stuck? Please ask for help in the WiFi Booth Community!

How to Connect your Nikon using Built-In WiFi

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This article will help you get WiFi Booth connected to your Nikon DSLR using its native wifi.

There is a caveat with Nikon wifi: since at the time of writing (updated August 2016) Nikon cameras do not support infrastructure mode (ie. the camera connecting to a router), which means you have to connect the iPad to the camera (e.g. D5300) or adapter (e.g. WU-1a/b). This means you cannot use Twitter or Dropbox integration (because there’s no internet access through the camera), and you must use BluePrint with a second iOS device to print (because Nikon doesn’t allow devices to communicate to each other via the camera). I really hope Nikon will fix this in a future version of their cameras. For more information about how to print with a second iOS device using BluePrint, please see this article.

How to Connect to your Nikon Camera

  1. Connect the iPad wifi to the Nikon camera, exactly the same way you would if you were transferring photos to the official Nikon iOS app.
  2. Start the WiFi Booth app in “Built-In Wifi” mode.
  3. After some moments the camera should connect to WiFi Booth. If your camera has additional steps to go through to when you connect the official iOS Nikon app, then perform these same steps on your camera.
  4. Configure your camera to save JPG (either only JPG, or JPG+RAW; the app will not download RAW files), and make sure the resolution is not too high. Remember, printing resolution is only 1800×1200 pixels in most cases, so more is overkill and just makes your iPad drain its battery faster. If photos arriving on the iPad are huge, you’ll get a warning.
  5. Photos you take will automatically appear in the app. You can trigger the camera manually (ie. with a radio trigger), or use the iPad to trigger the camera, or use the iPhone/Watch app to trigger the camera.

How to Connect your Canon using Built-In WiFi

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This article will help you connect everything with your Canon camera. Don’t connect your devices directly to the camera, because then you won’t have internet access for Twitter or Dropbox functionality.

Recommended: Using a Wireless Router

canon-wifi-router

 

If you have a dedicated wireless router that you can connect everything to (including portable 3G units like MiFi), then it is easy:

  1. Make sure that the iPad’s wifi is connected to the router you will connect everything to
  2. Start the WiFi Booth app and hit “Built-In Wifi”. Leave the app running.
  3. On the Canon, turn on wifi. Here’s where to find it:canon-wifi-menus
  4. While turning on wifi, you need to make a choice of the wifi mode. Choose smartphone mode. That’s the top-middle one: canon-wifi-menus-2
  5. Make sure you connect the camera in infrastructure mode to the same wifi network that the iPad is connected to. You can choose auto IP settings.
  6. After a few moments (in rare cases, it can take up to a minute or two!), the app automatically finds the camera and asks to connect to it. On the camera, you’ll see that WiFi Booth is requesting to connect. Hit OK to allow connection. Your camera will save these settings so that next time all you have to do is turn on the camera, and start wifi and the rest is automatic. Only after you’ve accepted the initial connection on the camera (once) does the app show that the camera is connected.
  7. Configure your camera to save JPG (either only JPG, or JPG+RAW; the app will not download RAW files), and make sure the resolution is not too high. Remember, printing resolution is only 1800×1200 pixels in most cases, so more is overkill and just makes your iPad drain its battery faster. If photos arriving on the iPad are huge, you’ll get a warning.
  8. Photos you take will automatically appear in the app. You can trigger the camera manually (ie. with a radio trigger), or use the iPad to trigger the camera, or use the iPhone/Watch app to trigger the camera.
  9. Get your printers on the same wifi network, and add them in the app’s settings screen. Done!

 

Using an iPhone’s Personal Hotspot

canon-wifi-iphone

 

If you have an iPhone that can use the Personal Hotspot feature, then:

  1. Turn on Personal Hotspot on the iPhone. Leave the iPhone on the Personal Hotspot screen while you configure or connect devices — see the section below for why.
  2. Connect your iPad’s wifi to the iPhone’s Personal Hotspot
  3. Connect your printer(s) wifi to the Personal Hotspot. At this point your iPhone no longer has to be on the Personal Hotspot screen.
  4. Start the WiFi Booth app and hit “Built-In Wifi”. Leave the app running.
  5. On the Canon, turn on wifi. Here’s where to find it:canon-wifi-menus
  6. While turning on wifi, you need to make a choice of the wifi mode. Choose smartphone mode. That’s the top-middle one: canon-wifi-menus-2
  7. Make sure you connect the camera in infrastructure mode to the same wifi network that the iPad is connected to. You can choose auto IP settings.
  8. After a few moments (in rare cases, it can take up to a minute or two!), the app automatically finds the camera and asks to connect to it. On the camera, you’ll see that WiFi Booth is requesting to connect. Hit OK to allow connection. Your camera will save these settings so that next time all you have to do is turn on the camera, and start wifi and the rest is automatic. Only after you’ve accepted the initial connection on the camera (once) does the app show that the camera is connected.
  9. Configure your camera to save JPG (either only JPG, or JPG+RAW; the app will not download RAW files), and make sure the resolution is not too high. Remember, printing resolution is only 1800×1200 pixels in most cases, so more is overkill and just makes your iPad drain its battery faster. If photos arriving on the iPad are huge, you’ll get a warning.
  10. Photos you take will automatically appear in the app. You can trigger the camera manually (ie. with a radio trigger), or use the iPad to trigger the camera, or use the iPhone/Watch app to trigger the camera.

Tip: Ensure the blue bar at the top of your iPhone (Personal Hotspot) is always showing at least 1 device connected (ie. your iPad, or 2 if you have a printer as well). As soon as nothing is connected, the Personal Hotspot is no longer reachable — even if Personal Hotspot is still ‘on’. See the section below for details.

 

Using the WiFi Booth iPad’s Personal Hotspot

canon-wifi-ipad

 

Otherwise, if the iPad that runs WiFi Booth can use the Personal Hotspot feature (requires the iPad to have a SIM card), and you have at least one other device that can stay connected to the iPad’s Personal Hotspot all the time (like a Canon Selphy printer) in order to keep it active, then:

  1. Turn on Personal Hotspot on the iPad. Leave the iPad on the Personal Hotspot screen while you configure or connect devices — see the section below for why.
  2. Connect a wireless device to the iPad which will stay connected, like a Canon Selphy printer. You can use an iPhone to hold the connection open too, but iPhones eventually drop their wireless connection if they are not used for some time, so be careful. Once you’ve done this, the iPad doesn’t have to stay on the Personal Hotspot screen anymore.
  3. If you didn’t already, connect your printer(s) wifi to the iPad’s Personal Hotspot
  4. Start the WiFi Booth app and hit “Built-In Wifi”. Leave the app running.
  5. On the Canon, turn on wifi. Here’s where to find it:canon-wifi-menus
  6. While turning on wifi, you need to make a choice of the wifi mode. Choose smartphone mode. That’s the top-middle one: canon-wifi-menus-2
  7. Make sure you connect the camera in infrastructure mode to the same wifi network that the iPad is connected to. You can choose auto IP settings.
  8. After a few moments (in rare cases, it can take up to a minute or two!), the app automatically finds the camera and asks to connect to it. On the camera, you’ll see that WiFi Booth is requesting to connect. Hit OK to allow connection. Your camera will save these settings so that next time all you have to do is turn on the camera, and start wifi and the rest is automatic. Only after you’ve accepted the initial connection on the camera (once) does the app show that the camera is connected.
  9. Configure your camera to save JPG (either only JPG, or JPG+RAW; the app will not download RAW files), and make sure the resolution is not too high. Remember, printing resolution is only 1800×1200 pixels in most cases, so more is overkill and just makes your iPad drain its battery faster. If photos arriving on the iPad are huge, you’ll get a warning.
  10. Photos you take will automatically appear in the app. You can trigger the camera manually (ie. with a radio trigger), or use the iPad to trigger the camera, or use the iPhone/Watch app to trigger the camera.

Tip: Ensure the blue bar at the top of your iPad (Personal Hotspot) is always showing at least 1 device connected (ie. your printer). As soon as nothing is connected, the Personal Hotspot is no longer reachable — even if Personal Hotspot is still ‘on’. See the section below for details.

Are you stuck? Please ask for help in the WiFi Booth Community!

 

More Information

iPad/iPhone Personal Hotspot Feature

It’s a simple feature right? Well… no! Here are some gotchas:

  • The Personal Hotspot feature only works when a SIM card is inserted
  • Your SIM card provider (your cellular provider) can disable Personal Hotspot so that you cannot turn it on. So if you can’t find this option, that might be why!
  • When there are no wireless connections to your iPad/iPhone, then a new wireless connection will only be accepted if the iPad/iPhone is on the Personal Hotspot screen (ie. where the switch to turn Personal Hotspot on/off is located). If some other app is open (like WiFi Booth), and there are no wireless connections to your personal hotspot, then new incoming wireless connections will be rejected.
  • When there is at least one existing wireless connection to your iPad/iPhone, then a new wireless connection will be accepted no matter what screen or app the device is showing. This means that a device which is constantly wirelessly connected (like a Canon Selphy printer) can “hold open” the Personal Hotspot feature, so that other devices can connect. Note that the existing connection must be a wireless one — just having the iPad/iPhone connected to a computer etc will not do it

How to get your Eye-Fi Mobi Pro Upload Key

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Oh my goodness, how often do I need to do this?!

Luckily, only once! If you get your upload key entered into the WiFi Booth app and all is working, then it will continue working until you change your Eye-Fi settings ie. in the official Eye-Fi software. Hint: once it’s working, don’t change your Eye-Fi card’s settings!

What do I need to get my Eye-Fi Upload Key?

To retrieve or generate your Eye-Fi Key, you’ll need a computer with the official Eye-Fi software installed, as well as a camera that works with your Eye-Fi card. To get the official software please visit http://eye.fi

I just got this Eye-Fi card — I have not used it yet

You need to first get the card transferring photos to your computer. This is necessary because it establishes the relationship between the card & computer, which creates the upload key on the computer.

Remember, you need to take 5+ photos with the card able to reach your selected wifi network before things photos start transferring. Verify that the card has the correct wifi networks set in Eye-Fi software, move it closer to the wifi access point, and make sure you take 5+ photos. If using a Canon/Nikon camera, also check that the Eye-Fi upload functionality is not disabled.

 

Eye-Fi Mobi Pro: Getting the Upload Key

You must install Eye-Fi Mobi Desktop to get your upload key. This is the software you probably already installed, in order to be able to use your card! To get the official software please visit http://eye.fi

Follow these steps:

  1. Insert the Eye-Fi Mobi Pro card into your computer (using the USB adapter if needed), and open Eye-Fi Mobi desktop. Ensure that the card is configured to connect to all of the wifi networks that you need it to! For example, your iPhone/iPad’s Personal Hotspot
  2. Ensure that at least once, one photo has successfully copied wirelessly from the card to your computer where the Eye-Fi software is running (this means, at least once ever; it doesn’t have to have been copied today)
  3. Get your upload key:

If you’re on a Mac, click spotlight search, find the application called “Terminal”, and open it. Then copy/paste the following command into Terminal (credit: TheBrew from ShutterSnitch):

If you have updated to Keenai:
dbres=$(sqlite3 ~/Library/Application\ Support/Keenai/offline.db 'SELECT o_mac_address, o_upload_key FROM o_devices') && keys=(${dbres//$'\n'/ }) && for keyandmac in "${keys[@]}"; do mobimac=${keyandmac:0:17}; mobikey=${keyandmac:18}; ssurl="wifibooth://setEyeFiKey/${mobimac}/${mobikey}"; open mailto:?body=$ssurl; done;

If you are still using Eye-Fi Mobi Pro app:
dbres=$(sqlite3 ~/Library/Application\ Support/Eyefi/Eyefi\ Mobi/offline.db 'SELECT o_mac_address, o_upload_key FROM o_devices') && keys=(${dbres//$'\n'/ }) && for keyandmac in "${keys[@]}"; do mobimac=${keyandmac:0:17}; mobikey=${keyandmac:18}; ssurl="wifibooth://setEyeFiKey/${mobimac}/${mobikey}"; open mailto:?body=$ssurl; done;

If you have an Eye-Fi X2 Pro card and you’re using the new X2 Utility:
dbres=$(sqlite3 ~/Library/Application\ Support/Eye-Fi/Eye-Fi\ X2\ Utility/offline.db 'SELECT o_mac_address, o_upload_key FROM o_devices') && keys=(${dbres//$'\n'/ }) && for keyandmac in "${keys[@]}"; do mobimac=${keyandmac:0:17}; mobikey=${keyandmac:18}; ssurl="wifibooth://setEyeFiKey/${mobimac}/${mobikey}"; open mailto:?body=$ssurl; done;

Send the email to yourself on your iPad. On your iPad, open the email and touch the wifibooth link — it will open in the app directly and automatically save the key.

If you’re on Windows, follow part C from the Eye-Fi Pro X2 article (link), to manually retrieve your upload key from your Settings.xml file.

Finally, email the key to yourself on your iPad. On your iPad, copy the key and paste it into WiFi Booth.

 

Are you stuck? Ask questions and get help at the WiFi Booth Community.

How to get your Eye-Fi X2 Pro Upload Key

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Are you using the new Eye-Fi X2 Utility?

If you are using the software that came with the X2 Pro card when you bought it, then you’re on the right page. If you have the much newer “Eye-Fi X2 Utility“, then you need to use the instructions for the Mobi Pro card instead

Oh my goodness, how often do I need to do this?!

Luckily, only once! If you get your upload key entered into the WiFi Booth app and all is working, then it will continue working until you change your Eye-Fi settings ie. in the official Eye-Fi software. Hint: once it’s working, don’t change your Eye-Fi card’s settings!

What do I need to get my Eye-Fi Upload Key?

To retrieve or generate your Eye-Fi Key, you’ll need a computer with the official Eye-Fi software installed, as well as a camera that works with your Eye-Fi card. To get the official software please visit http://eye.fi

I just got this Eye-Fi card — I have not used it yet

You need to first get the card transferring photos to your computer. This is necessary because it establishes the relationship between the card & computer, which creates the upload key on the computer.

Remember, you need to take 5+ photos with the card able to reach your selected wifi network before things photos start transferring. Verify that the card has the correct wifi networks set in Eye-Fi software, move it closer to the wifi access point, and make sure you take 5+ photos. If using a Canon/Nikon camera, also check that the Eye-Fi upload functionality is not disabled.

Eye-Fi Pro X2: Getting the Upload Key

You must install Eye-Fi Center Desktop Software to get your key. This is the software you probably already installed, in order to be able to use your card! Otherwise please visit http://eye.fi 

Follow these steps.

 

A. First you must configure the Eye-Fi card settings 

  1. Insert the Eye-Fi card into your computer (using the provided card-reader, or however you normally do it)
  2. Start the Eye-Fi app. At the time of writing, this is called Eye-Fi Center.
  3. Locate the Eye-Fi card in the left-hand column, and click the little cog icon:    Screen Shot 2015-05-07 at 3.21.04 PM
  4. On the first tab (“Networks”) verify that all the wireless networks you wish to connect with are listed as Private Networks. Important: turn OFF direct mode, if you plan to use the recommended setup of connecting to an existing wifi hotspot.
  5. On the second tab (“Photos”), configure photos to be sent to this computer (the one you’re on now; the options below like sub-folder etc do not matter), and disable the Online (Eye-Fi cloud) feature
  6. On the third tab (“Raw”), disable RAW file transfers (the app does not support RAW files)
  7. On the fourth tab (“Video”), disable Video transfers (the app does not support Video files)
  8. On the fifth tab (“Eye-Fi View”), disable Eye-Fi view (you don’t want the card chewing up bandwidth, and using this service at the same time as the app has not been tested)
  9. On the seventh tab (“Geotagging”), disable Geotagging
  10. On the eighth tab (“Transfer Mode”), first sub-tab (“Selective Transfer”), set this to Automatic
  11. On the eighth tab (“Transfer Mode”), second sub-tab (“Relayed Transfer”), disable Relayed Transfer (not supported by the app and appears to influence how upload keys are made)
  12. Save all the settings and make sure your changes were saved successfully.

 

B. Next, you need to transfer at least one photo to the computer, to ensure the Upload Key and Transfer Mode are saved to your Settings.xml file

  1. Eject the Eye-Fi card safely from your computer, and leave all of the Eye-Fi software running. Insert the Eye-Fi card into your camera.
  2. Take some pictures on your camera, until at least one or two have copied from the Eye-Fi card onto the computer. You should see this happen via a popup window, or in the Eye-Fi center directly. You might need to take 5+ photos until anything happens.
    • If you can’t get it to work, check that your computer is connected to the same wifi network that you specified in step A-4 above (the wifi network the Eye-Fi card will connect to)
  3. Once the test photos have finished transferring, quit out of all Eye-Fi software (Eye-Fi Helper and Eye-Fi Center). Make sure that you don’t minimize — you must quit instead.
    • On a Mac, select Eye-Fi center and hit CMD-Q. Then select Eye-Fi helper on the top-bar; the helper icon looks like this:  Screen Shot 2015-05-07 at 4.09.07 PM. Select Quit from the menu.

 

C. Finally, you need to retrieve your Upload Key from your Settings.xml file

On Mac, open Finder, hold down ALT, and click the Go menu -> Library. Keep holding ALT until you clicked on Library. Inside the Library folder, find the Eye-Fi folder -> the Settings.xml file is in here.

On Windows Vista, 7, and 8, the location is C:\Users\[user]\AppData\Roaming\Eye-Fi\Settings.xml – where [user] – is your current login name.

On Windows XP, the location is C:\Documents and Settings\[user]\Application Data\Eye-Fi\Settings.xml

Once you have found your Settings.xml, follow these steps:

  1. Open Settings.xml in your favorite text editor (ie. Notepad on Windows or TextEdit on Mac)
  2. Check and make sure that TransferMode is set to 2, as in the example below. If not, close Settings.xml and go back to repeat step A-5 by unchecking “Upload photos to this computer”, saving, re-checking it, and saving again.
  3. Check and make sure that your Card only has ONE UploadKey. If it is has more than one, do the following: delete ALL upload keys in the .xml file, save it, close it, and repeat all steps from the very beginning again
  4. OK phew, done! Your upload key is sandwiched between <UploadKey> and </UploadKey>. In the example below, my UploadKey is f2f5a1fff422b2b8e3d62d6462c078be — that’s what I need to put into the WiFi Booth app. Note that it’s safest to copy/paste the key into an email, email it to yourself, open the email on the iPad, copy it there, and paste it directly into WiFi Booth.
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="yes" ?>
   <Config version="2.0">
    <ShowThumbnailPreview>true</ShowThumbnailPreview>
     <MIB>
       <ReceivedCounter>17</ReceivedCounter>
     </MIB>
     <Cards>
       <Card MacAddress="00-18-56-62-4d-f7">
        <UploadKey>f2f5a1fff422b2b8e3d62d6462c078be</UploadKey>
        <DownsyncKey>6ca3311d93e46a9f3404c5b2676ab605</DownsyncKey>
        <TransferMode>2</TransferMode>
        <TransferModeTimestamp>1417466370</TransferModeTimestamp>
...

Are you stuck? Ask questions and get help at the WiFi Booth Community.